The Cerebral Palsy Profile of Health and Function: Upper-Extremity Domain’s Sensitivity to Change Following Musculoskeletal Surgery

Published:February 04, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2018.12.007

      Purpose

      The Cerebral Palsy Profile of Health and Function (CP-PRO) Computerized Adaptive Tests (CAT) are quality of life measures developed specifically for use in children with cerebral palsy. This study examined the ability of the upper-extremity (UE) CP-PRO CAT to detect change in function after UE surgery compared with the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI), ABILHAND-Kids, and Box and Blocks test.

      Methods

      From 2009 to 2013, children with cerebral palsy who had UE musculoskeletal surgery completed the UE CP-PRO CAT, PODCI-UE, ABILHAND-Kids, and Box and Blocks tests before surgery (97 children) and at 3 postoperative intervals: 6 months (80 children), 12 months (73 children), and 24 months (52 children). Mean, SD, effect size (ES), and standardized response mean (SRM) values for each measure at each time interval and each level of the Manual Ability Classification System were calculated and compared. Finally, the minimal detectable change at the 90% confidence level was determined.

      Results

      Values for the ES (0.40) and SRM (0.53) for the UE CP-PRO CAT at baseline to 6 months were moderate and significantly greater than the PODCI-UE (ES, 0.18; SRM, 0.25). The ES and SRM for the PODCI-UE, ABILHAND-Kids, and Box and Blocks tests were not significantly greater than for the UE CP-PRO CAT at any period. From baseline to 6 months, the UE CP-PRO CAT detected a large and significant improvement for Manual Ability Classification System level II (SRM, 0.70; ES, 0.70). The minimal detectable change for the UE CP-PRO CAT was 5.20.

      Conclusions

      The UE CP-PRO CAT is significantly better in detecting change in UE function in the first 6 months after surgery and is comparable to other measures at 12 and 24 months.

      Type of study/level of evidence

      Diagnostic II.

      Key words

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